Are you unable to work because of a disability? Get the answers you need on Social Security Disability to protect your rights

Keefe Disability Law has compiled a list of the most frequently asked questions in response to the overwhelming number of people who need help with the Social Security Disability process in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. If you are disabled and need help with disability benefits, read on to learn how to protect your legal rights.

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  • Will I lose my Massachusetts Social Security disability benefits if I take a part-time job?

    Not necessarily. The Social Security Administration wants you to live as full a life as possible. That said, there are some disabled Americans who will never return to the workforce. But most disability beneficiaries want to work.

    First, it is difficult to live on the typically small benefit you may receive. Second, working can bring a sense of self-worth and greater wellbeing than remaining at home all the time.

    If you have found a job that suits your abilities and want to pursue it, you will probably be able to do it. You can work for nine months with no questions or interruptions in your benefits. This is plenty of time to see if you are able to continue.

    After this, you can continue to work for three more years if you are making less than $1000 per month. And many people do not realize that they can retain their Medicare coverage for up to eight-and-a-half years and still work.

    So, if you decide to try going back to work, you can do it. And if you still have questions, please call Keefe Disability Law in Massachusetts for answers. Our toll free number is 888-904-6847 and we serve clients throughout the New England area.

  • I have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and am still working at my Massachusetts job. Is there anything I can do to keep working longer and stay off disability?

    Yes! There is. Exercise. While there is no known cure for arthritis, many patients have found that physical activity is helpful in managing their disease.

    Most arthritis sufferers fear exercise because they feel that it will damage their joints and cause more pain. Actually, lack of exercise can make RA worse and even affect your cardiac health. Exercise can help to maintain mobility and ward off cardiovascular disease. It has even been linked to prevention of RA.

    How much and what type of physical activity you do should be decided between you and your doctor or a physical therapist. However, the Arthritis Foundation recommends three general types, You can visit their website for more information:

    • Flexibility (stretching, range-of-motion) exercises
    • Strengthening (Resistance) exercises
    • Cardiovascular (aerobic) exercises

    So get out and get moving! Medical science and common sense are both behind you. You really can manage your condition by moving more.

    Keefe Disability Law wants you to keep working at your Massachusetts job just as long as you can. If your condition has made it more and more difficult for you to work, contact us for information on filing for Social Security disability benefits. You can call us toll free at 888-904-6847 or fill in the form on this page for a free case review.

  • My family member knows everything that I go through. Can he testify during my hearing?

    We always encourage claimants to bring family members or friends to the hearing for support.  That family member can sit down with the claimant and the attorney before the hearing to discuss the case and help the claimant feel comfortable leading up to the hearing. 

    Believe it or not, there are only rare instances when a judge feels it is necessary to hear from someone other than the claimant.  During the hearing, the ALJ wants to get to know the claimant and understand the difficulties she is facing because of her impairments.  Often, testimony from an additional person only clouds the issues and takes attention away from the claimant's personal experiences.  Also, it is inevitable that the family member's testimony will differ, at least slightly, from the claimant's testimony and an ALJ is permitted to use those inconsistencies to evaluate the claimant's credibility. That's why it is almost always best to focus the testimony on the claimant and bring family members or friends for support before and after the hearing.